Thursday, November 1, 2007

Computer-drawn or hand-drawn diagrams ?









I'm developing diagrams for a new edition of my book on H.264/AVC. I've been experimenting with hand-drawn vs. computer-drawn diagrams. I quite like the immediacy of hand-drawn diagrams. Here are a few examples - I'd like to have your opinions on these. Please leave a comment (or send me an email) with your views - do you prefer hand-drawn or computer-drawn?

The examples are in this file:
Figures_H264book_poll.pdf

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

As long as handwriting is readable, I think hand drawn are more expressive. I vote for hand drwaings. -R

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I've read the previous edition of your book.I think computer-drawn would be more clear.

Anonymous said...

I agree with the first post as hand-written reflects exactly what the author intends. Although they seem a bit rough, would they look exactly like that in the books new version??

Iain Richardson said...

Just to follow up on the 3rd comment.. my current plan is to use hand-drawn diagrams but probably with computer-drawn text. Thanks for the useful discussion. - Iain

Anonymous said...

Iain, I like the hand drawings as well. And let me add, your site is excellent particularly the tutorials. Keep them rolling, you're helping more people than you know. Cheers.

Jai said...

Hi,
I have a confussion with Mpeg4 and H.264 ,could you please explain what is the difference between MPEG4 and H.264 & how H.264 varies from Mpeg4 compression?

Jai said...

Hi,
I have a confusion with Mpeg4 and H.264 always,could you please explain what is the difference between MPEG4 and H.264 & how H.264 varies from Mpeg4 compression?

Praveen said...

A mix of both computer drawn and hand-drawn would be great. Hand-drawn diagrams can be used where more explanation is needed in the figure through text and other hand-made graphics straight from imagination. while computer diagrams would be useful for figures involving 3D kind of graphics which are tough to draw using hand and if they are, they might confuse the reader at times (eg. shadings)